Thoughts and Quotes from “Atomic Habits” by James Clear

Atomic HabitsChange can take years before it happens all at once.

I stopped by the local bookstore to pick up my next read. The entrance display showcased this recently released book. The mental warfare against myself that week drew my attention to the title. I picked it up, read the cover-slip, and put it back with a smirk – “I don’t need this self-help crap.”

From there, I headed to the business section where true intellectual entrepreneurs seek knowledge and sharpen their edge. To my surprise, the book was also showcased here. My suppressed superstitions were awakened as my mind whispered, “It must be a sign.” I purchased the book and made my way to the airport. Continue reading “Thoughts and Quotes from “Atomic Habits” by James Clear”

Thoughts and quotes from “Freakonomics” by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

Numbers tend to lie less badly than people do.

Freakonomics

I am little behind the curve on this one. The book was originally published in 2005. I have heard it referenced many times thought the years. I finally read it in 2019.

I enjoyed this book a lot. In fact, it made me wonder if I had missed my intended calling as a psychiatry-economics-sociologist. The book takes on multiple sets of assumptions and asks, “Is common thought, factual thought?” or “Is there a better explanation for this?”

Here are a few of the quotes I noted along the way:

“Extreme Ownership” by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin

For all the definitions, descriptions, and characterizations of leaders, there are only two that matter: effective and ineffective. Effective leaders led successful teams that accomplish their mission and win. Ineffective leaders do not.

Continue reading ““Extreme Ownership” by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin”

“The Ruler’s Guide” by Chinghua Tang

The Ruler's Guide

There are many good beginnings, but few food endings.

After a discussion on leadership, this book was given to me by a friend and co-worker – David Cable. I thoroughly enjoyed the read and would recommended to anyone interested in fundamental, practical leadership principles.

We all know that getting to the top is difficult and staying there is even harder. Through the years great empires faced a 4 century lifecycle.  This 400 year lifespan has played out many times over throughout history. Given that the United States is about 240 years down this path, one can conclude that we are most likely on the downhill path toward a major fall.

While history is a good teacher, I do not believe it serves as an infallible prophet of all things to come. Is it possible to break this cycle? Can a world leader survive?

Beyond that, can any entity sustain at the peak beyond the historic cycles? Continue reading ““The Ruler’s Guide” by Chinghua Tang”